Category: Pop Culture

Weekend Links

Kittens, it’s been…it’s been a week. There are a lot of troubles in the world. I’ve tried to round up some important stories in our usual interest realms – media and information, politics, and cheese. I’ve tossed in goodness to help the grim go down better.

Love you all, stay safe in the heat!

Iconic.

All families have some kind of secret history.

NOT NOW, PLAGUE.

Racist dogwhistles (and outright racism) to own the libs. Damaging the environment in ways that will affect our entire species to own the libs. Practicing cruelty and exclusion of marginalized people to own the libs. Economic self harm to own the libs. It’s just a fundamentally bizarre way of thinking to me and I’ve given up trying to understand it. It’s a pointless game of one downsmanship.

It’s a cult.

If 2020 has a theme it’s that all the screen tropes are happening in real life.

You’d think I’d be unmoved by all the evidence confirming my worst feelings about his capability and fitness for the office he holds, but I still manage to find myself grimly shocked.

Oof

Monica speaks wisdom.

HOLY CRAP. If “everything Trump touches dies” holds true, I will not be sorry to see bogus culture wars be among his anti-Midas-touch victims. I for one have no sympathy for those who have enabled the worst fringes of their own team to the point that almost every norm is trampled and every institution is under suspicion.

Yes please, I want more African ballet across the board.

Save the cheese!

And why you should exercise caution about those “save the children” campaigns you’re suddenly seeing crop up everywhere. It’s not happening on accident. Be sure of your information and its sources.

Weekend Links

Another Friday in the year of our Lady Beyonce 2020. Lockdown easement is paused in the UK because cases are rising, Trump is floating the idea to delay the election (thus far a nonstarter, but let’s be honest this year is already a mess and nothing surprises me anymore), and the sea is rising.

It’s a lot. It’s a helluva lot. But today we’re going to educate ourselves, enjoy some social commentary, media discourse, and hilarity. Love you all, kittens. Check in the comments. 

Femaleness, male incivility, and how our reactions are often scrutinized more than their behavior. Traister strikes again.

Ooh, speaking of, let’s delve into this more, shall we? “Evangelical support for Trump was no aberration, nor was it merely a pragmatic choice,” Du Mez writes. “It was, rather, the culmination of evangelicals’ embrace of militant masculinity, an ideology that enshrines patriarchal authority and condones the callous display of power, at home and abroad.”

Using wealth for good.

The thrill of free fall has worn off, replaced by the general sensation of crashing. Ultradomesticity was comforting for a while — we should seize this opportunity to slow down, I read, way back in April — but now I would like to leave my house without weighing the potential consequences. I would like the freedom that comes from knowing I can go anywhere, or do anything, without the constant specter of disease. That’s a lot to ask of any hobby.

Her comedy genius is that she simply repeats him, word for word. No polite editing, no attempts to make full sentences out of discombobulated thoughts, just redelivering the exact same words without the benefits of his office. And yeah, it sounds ridiculous because it is.

Ah yes, more fun in the world of communicable disease. It’s history but a timely reminder that we basically continue to exist thanks to a matter of cosmic luck and nothing is certain.

In my personal experience, the venn diagram of people who don’t believe in climate change and those who are anti-immigration is a circle. One of these perspectives is going to have to give before the cognitive dissonance cripples their neurons.

A depressing but not unbelievable argument.

I think about this a lot as an expat. My passport has made my life and movement very easy and it’s almost impossible for me to conceptualize a world in which it doesn’t give me the freedom I’m used to. But that world is fast approaching and is one of many reasons Jeff and I are considering dual citizenship at some point.

Problematic allies are still allies…but stay wary.

Something about barn doors and horses. But seriously, until we come up with a better way to categorize and contain the publishers of misinformation, we’re going to struggle. Side rant, this is the benefit of professionalized media and proper journalism. And we’re long past the point that social media should be considered just a platform instead of a publisher of some kind with editorial liability.

I’ve not become a knitter in lockdown, but X has and I’m going to benefit from her artistic labor.

If you’re not angry about this, you’re not paying attention. Also, once more for the cheap seats in the back, anyone who ranted to me for the Obama years about impending martial law or Jade Helm conspiracy theories or any assorted government abuses had better be speaking the fuck up now. Because the silence I’m getting from those voices is really, really telling. The problem was never authority, the problem was always authority that you perceived to be “not on your side.”

“Demon sperm” and “astral sex” started trending this week in politics, because we live in the dumbest and most infuriating timeline.

Art from pain. Timely.

Representative Lewis was laid to rest and eulogized by calls, not to lionize his work, but to keep marching. His posthumous essay is worth your time.

Weekend Links

This was a rough week as some of the ripple effects of the pandemic continued to land closer and closer to home. We’re still okay for the moment, but several close friends have been intimately affected. I’m feeling a horrible mix of survivors guilt, selfish gratitude for not yet being hit by the waves, and a general uptick in the overall creeping sense of dread that basically every millennial I know enjoys. 

Staring down the barrel of the second major recession of our lives and basically all the same people are still in power. Love that for us! (screams into a cushion) 

Have some links, check in in the comments, and pour yourself something nice, my doves. 

Is the death of the It Bag on the horizon?

The most basic definition of hate is personal animus, but there is a more useful, and frightening, description: Hate is a social bond — a shared currency — and it abhors a vacuum.”

The largest issue seemed clear to me, in part because I was accustomed to it: that the letter, at core, was at once a theoretical defense of intellectual freedom and a carefully veiled invitation to use dehumanizing rhetoric under the bastion of ‘the free exchange of ideas.”

Oh look, another misogyny murder

How do we feel about pennies, team?

And I’m sure that any moment now, all the gun enthusiasts who’ve hoarded weapons in fear of the federal government, all the states rights activists, all the small government zealots, and all their kith and kin will rise up to denounce this, right? (Editor’s note: of course they won’t. Because with a few exceptions it’s never been about any of those issues. As a collective, these people are perfectly fine with overreach, size, and power so long as they feel it’s on their side. They aren’t opposed to it, they’re opposed to feeling like it doesn’t benefit them and their ingroups. Which is, of course, they hallmark of fascism: the worship, elevation, and triumph of the ingroup over one’s – usually falsely manufactured – enemies.)

Fire your branding people. While I applaud the direction overall, it’s been messy with its messaging. 

Fellow ladies, hands up if a man has ever called you a “fucking bitch.” Now again friends, hands up if a COWORKER who call you that in your workplace would at minimum face a disciplinary hearing

Support your locals!

Eurocentric history does not benefit us, we’re missing thousands of years of culture and human interaction because of it!

I’m too, um, endowed for this. Alas. Sounds restful. 

Weekend Links

Another Friday, another links drop. This week we’re talking media, privacy, the changing nature of platforms and content creators, nostalgia, and Things To Be Mad About. It’s a smorgasbord of things to discuss in the comments, kittens!

Extra love to all the SDS OGs who checked in on my last post with wonderful updates about life, family, and work in these uNpReCeDeNtEd TiMeS. I love our weird little blog community.

Take care of yourself this weekend, my doves.

YouTube is going through a shift, in my opinion. Yeah it’s sort of related to the Beauty Guru Drama, but a lot of top creators are quitting or dramatically changing their approach. Some of them are citing the limitations of the algorithm, some are burned out. Others feel burdened by their old content and feel it doesn’t reflect them anymore, while still don’t want to or can’t delete it because it’s part of their brand or income streams.

In other social media news this week, yikes.

I’m shocked. SHOCKED. (Update, I remain UTTERLY SHOCKED…)

FUCK THIS. This is bad and dangerous, full stop.

Speaking of, I continue to be astounded by the sheer amount of visual evidence that is just…ignored or disregarded about police abuses of force and power. It’s like visual Newspeak.

And she’s stunning.

It’s the corruption, stupid.

Garment workers – likely to be female, from underdeveloped nations, and in slave labor conditions – deserve better. #PayUp

If there’s one thing that unites Small Dog Nation, it’s an art heist!

None of this had to happen and it’s both infuriating and heartbreaking. Performative politics and deliberate misinformation is killing people.

It’s basically the 1930s now. Lean into radio theatre, my doves.

WERK.

I’m all for more female Emperors. Imperatrixes, if you will.

Well, this is happening at some point this summer.

Divorce him, girl.

Someone please explain a good faith justification for this because I am drawing an absolute blank. States are once again running out of hospital beds and the administration is privatizing the data management? Meanwhile some governors are banning face coverings to own the libs or whatever.

The immediate public health crisis is hideous and hundreds of thousands of people have died and we haven’t seen the end of it. But the longer term secondary effects are going to be horrible in new ways. In the US, over 5 million people have lost healthcare so far this year, and 20 million face potential eviction. And as for consumer debt, well

A writer I really enjoy on practicing hope.

Owen Jones put his opinion (and incidentally my own) succinctly. You cannot hold the majority of institutional power and still claim be the victim because people on Twitter are mad at you.

THE ONLY REBOOT WORTH GETTING EXCITED OVER.

I’m not at all surprised to see that he’s been demoted but not exiled. Grifters gonna grift together. I’m also not at all surprised that he was the last to hear about it.

A generation of women are opting out of parenthood. That doesn’t make them selfish, shallow or in denial, but it does make society feel uncomfortable.”

Of course they are.

Weekend Links

Hi fam, how are we? We limber, rested, hydrated? Or we spiraling into existential dread? All are welcome in Small Dog Nation without guilt or shame.

This week’s links are not terribly light and fluffy, but are important. We’re emphasizing online culture, disinformation, and one or two nice things thrown in to surprise the palate. Let me know what you’re up to in the comments and keep safe!

Everyone who wants to understand current radicalization of all stripes NEEDS to understand the transition from meme/online culture to real life. Whether ISIS’ robust online PR operation to radical leftist anarchists on 4chan, the pathways are eerily similar.

as I was saying

again, still saying

Not unrelated: the attention economy politicians work, think, and measure success in a different way than actual politicians. Understanding this is important.

We’ve still focused on the police, don’t get it twisted. But we need to understand their culture in order to make change.

Also key: how the internet and online life is changing. Will the attention economy politicians keep up or will they be outstripped or outflanked by the meme cycle – including among their own ranks? I continue to believe that this cycle has dragged the right and left in their extremists directions more than leadership has – people are radicalizing themselves and institutions are scrambling to catch up or retain control. I also believe that the right has been more effective at allying around specific topics and staying on message than the left…but that this has in turn exacerbated the radicalization process and that they are at real risk of losing control of their wingnuts.

no shit, Sherlock.

Yep. Sure. The problem with the royal family is this pair and not…this mess. Sure.

Snowflakes.

Speaking of, “The Right Wing Myth of the Left Wing Mob,” is something that I sincerely want to send to a dozen specific people. But I’m not trying to convert anyone anymore (she reminded herself).

Meanwhile, on YouTube

Here is a nice list of book recommendations to consider!

(takes deep breath) BIRTH CONTROL IS HEALTHCARE. This week the US Supreme Court gave the double whammy of allowing employers to deny birth control coverage to workers on religious grounds, AND upheld religious organizations right to discriminatory hiring practices. I worked for an institution like this once. Never again. I had health insurance and Planned Parenthood was STILL a better option for my reproductive health.

10% of our entire population.

Weekend Links – Independence Day Edition

Hey piglets, another short and dirty links post for your reading pleasure. We’ve got pandemics, fake feminism, Russian bounties, and even some GOOD news stories. The pubs are opening this weekend in the UK and Jeff and I will be staying firmly indoors, thanks. People who are acting like the global crisis will half a million cases and hundreds of thousands of deaths is somehow over stress me out. It isn’t. Make good choices, kids.

We’re going to fry some chicken, watch some Hamilton on Disney+, and only go outside with masks. Happy Fourth, yanks!

It didn’t need to be this way.

My brother is currently deployed. I hate this man as I have never hated any politician in my life. (ETA update.)

Politically I’m gleeful. Professionally I acknowledge the conflict of how many jobs and support industries this is going to affect, including my own. What a weird time to be alive.

The current cultural pushback against girlbosses isn’t a desire to be done pursuing equality, or to stop trying to eliminate workplace disparities. This mode of empowerment was briefly successful exactly because people had become more aware of—and uncomfortable with—the way power functions in America.”

Yes, let’s try it! Let’s run the experiment!

We don’t deserve dogs.

Huh. Totally inconsequential, I’m sure.

If you are just learning about how many of the “confederate” monuments and symbols are nowhere near the actual historical southern states…catch up. It’s about white supremacy, peeps.

Powerful opinion piece.

I think if he weren’t such an appalling human being, he would make a great president…” What an extraordinary statement and fundamental disconnect between one and the other. I continue to despair at the myth that he was a successful business man – he wasn’t, HE JUST PLAYED ONE ON TV. And the tired line that good business people make good leaders needs to die. Business and government are not the same thing and should never be confused. We don’t need fewer “politicians” in politics, we need better politicians who are actually interested in governing.

Huh. Well, let’s see what happens now. The attention here in the UK is on Prince Andrew.

Hey, some good news!

I am horribly late to this, but Todrick CAME THROUGH for us all:

Weekend Links

Hey fam, a short dump of links for you this Friday afternoon. I’m “on holiday,” which is hilariously no different from most days of the last three months, except I’m only checking my work emails rarely. It’s blistering hot and so everyone in Britain seems to be flooding the beaches and parks, which cynical me is darkly clocking as the beginning of our next “spike.” People are acting as if we’re through this. We’re not. I’m side-eyeing all the needless new cases in the States because people wanted to perform their tribalism more than listen to the science.

So this weekend, stay focused. Don’t let the discourse on racism fade, wear a mask, look after other people.

 

Both ridiculous and still deeply wholesome.

On the flip side, I’ll take headlines I never thought I’d see for $200, Alex.

Demilitarize the damn police!

Rooting for these two. I suspect he’s going through a similar culture shock, the way I assume she did (and has alluded to publicly) in the other direction, but they seem to have more privacy and more control and I hope it’s empowering and rewarding.

No complacency, it’s still #blacklivesmatter and #blacktranslivesmatter. If people have let it slide from their attention, shake the table.

This whole thing could not have gone less according to plan. And I am CACKLING as to one of the key reasons why. The kids are alright.

A beautiful piece on fatherhood.

Archaeology story!

Oh wow…guys, as much as we appreciate the effort, maybe let’s leave this stuff to the actual experts from now on?

Majestic.

And let’s also pay homage to the queen of camp herself, while we’re at it.

When we’re talking about white folx they don’t call it “identity politics,” but they should.

Racism isn’t meanness, it isn’t slurs. Those are the scabs, like smallpox. Racism is the virus itself which invades, overrides, infects, and produces the rot.

Once again, Leena Norms, everybody:

Weekend Links – Juneteenth

It took me into my 20s to learn what Juneteenth was. It needs to be an American holiday – along with election day, December 6th (13th Amendment), July 2nd (Civil Right Act of 1968) and August 18th (which I humbly suggest should be Suffragette Day). Every time the vote – and therefore the privileges of democracy and citizenship – were expanded deserves commemoration, as do the days associated with the end of slavery. It’s our Original Sin as a nation.

Good. Document the hell out of this moment.

Whiteness can’t save us.”

Protests work.

Less than two weeks.

Stay in the streets.

Finally some good news!

Less good news!

The police are a reflection of a society. They’re not a rogue alien organization that came down to torment the black community. They’re enforcing segregation. Segregation is legally over, but it never ended. The police are, in some respects, a border patrol, and they patrol the border between the two Americas.”

I am going to re-up this as often as needed: Antifa is not a group, an organization, or a confederacy (pun VERY much intended). It’s at best a very loose philosophy. More importantly, it’s a right-wing propaganda point and often outright conspiracy theory to create a sense of false equivalence which is not born out by the facts. The extremist violence we are seeing is almost exclusively coming from far right groups – whether throwing up Nazi salutes in London to – checks notes – defend Churchill, or using the cover of protests in the States to carry out violence aimed to incite an actual race/civil war. False equivalence and whataboutism are dangerous. If you feel able, challenge it when you see or hear it.

Gonna go out on a limb and say stuff like this doesn’t make it easy for various communities to trust cops. Also a good media and propaganda lesson for everyone about how bad information spreads – bad actors and genuine sympathizers.

Also, at least six black men and boys have been found hanging from trees in the last two weeks. Transparent investigations NOW, with oversight, because the so-called best case scenario is a rash of suicides (horrifying) and the worst is a rash of hate crimes that call back to the worst days of black oppression. And either way, a lot of law enforcement are hella untrustworthy.

Here, a palate cleanser for us after a dose of heavy links!

Also a story for Pride Month.

We need less indigenous “inspired” creative work, and more spotlighting and space for actual indigenous creative work from the artists themselves.

The intersecting worlds of publication, beauty, and fashion have a lot of work to do. Caroline Hirons delves.

Trump never wanted the job in the first place. The real question is, how does a clinical narcissist who refused to acknowledge any kind of wrongdoing, loss, or error either 1) decide not to run, which damages his ego, 2) or risk losing, which damages his ego?

The internet is fantastic.

I’m Not Trying to Convert Anyone Anymore

I’ve been thinking a lot about argument, discussion, debate and discourse lately. For obvious reasons. When I argue these days, it’s to stand up for a point I think is important or advocate for a value I believe in. But I no longer really try to convince other people that they’re wrong and I’m right. In many cases I’ve simply lost faith that it has much of an effect, but at a deeper level this is yet another callback to my Mormon upbringing and worldview.

Mormonism is a missionary faith – as is pretty well known. Most everyone has seen or had an interaction with the official missionaries out and about, or is familiar with them as a concept through pop culture. Missionary service is an expectation of young men, and increasingly encouraged for young women (which didn’t use to be the case compared to encouraging them to prioritize marriage). Not only that, there is a perpetual mission effort within the culture and structure of congregations, supported by messages and guidance encouraging all adherents to proselytize. “Every member a missionary,” as the slogan goes.

This attitude towards conversion comes from a place of genuine love and caring. The underlying premise is that if you have found Truth, you have an obligation to lead others to that truth. If knowledge of this truth is necessary to salvation, you do not have a right to keep it to yourself and deny others the opportunity. If you love something, if you believe it: you share it. Complacency about other people’s understanding is not allowed.

My observation is that this attitude remains intact even if one leaves the faith. I’ve written before how my Mormon-ness doesn’t “wash off,” even if I no longer believe in it. The cultural conditioning and in-built heritage remains. I don’t think I’m alone in this. I’ve noticed that a lot of people who leave the church seem to go through a period where they seem to try to replicate missionary work in reverse – having become convinced of the “truth” (in this case, the falseness of the faith), they want to “open other people’s eyes” to it. Whether knowingly or otherwise, I witness a lot of people try to use the same tools of conversion for deconversion. And for the same reasons! If you care about someone, you want the best for them. Ergo, if you think a belief system is bad, you are unable to be complacent about it and feel a responsibility for their welfare.

Here’s the thing: I don’t think it works.

No one “deconverted” me from my faith. It was the result of over a decade of intense internal debate and inquiry. Topic after topic was picked up, examine, interrogated, debated, researched, and – yes – prayed over. Gradually ideas, realizations, perceptions, and information combined and coalesced into something I could no longer deny: I did not believe the same things that the organization taught. I thought it was wrong, I didn’t trust or believe several of its key truth claims, I could not participate in the community and remain true to the things I did believe, and there was no successful path for a cultural participation in the heritage of the faith without also a full throated and genuine adherence to its beliefs structures.

And every time I have tried to explain this process to a believer – a misguided attempt to do “missionary work” for my experience and perspective – I have failed to do it justice. I have failed to explain it in a way that makes sense to them, or they have failed to listen. We are operating from two fundamentally different perspectives of Capital T Truth.

I was having a vigorous (but respectful) political discussion with a loved one the other day that centered on the protests against police brutality in the States. We do not agree politically, but are able to argue and debate fairly successfully. I love this person, and they love me and while our differences have caused friction, they have not caused rift. In this I am so much more lucky than many people I know and I’m grateful beyond words for it.

The most significant aspect of this conversation for me happened towards the end of the discussion. After debating philosophical differences between sides of the political spectrum, trading thoughts on what the manifestations of those differences are, and talking Big Picture concepts, I referred to my own (admittedly anecdotal) experience of working for a police department myself for five years and what I witnessed there. (For those who don’t know, this police department was affiliated with my alma mater and a religious institution.)

This person’s reaction was along the lines of, “That experience really ruined a lot of things for you.” The implication being, that my political and religious views were fundamentally changed during this period of my life – and not for the better.

My immediate reaction was a flash of white hot anger. It felt really belittling to be told, in effect, “Your reaction to your own personal experience and observations are wrong,” by a person who was not there, was not privy to my thought process, and in spite of these gaps, does not see some of the choices I’ve made as valid or correct.

But after a beat, calm reasserted itself because the truth is, this person is right. Working for a police department for five years did change my view of policing. Which is a perfectly rational progression of events. Most people with opinion on policing have never worked for PD! And working at an institution controlled and managed by a religious organization also informed my view of that organization. Which again, feels like a pretty sensible way to form a point of view. I know a lot of people with views on religion who have never stepped foot in a place of worship. Now, we can debate the rightness or wrongness of my opinions, but at least they are informed by years worth of first hand investigation and inquiry!

This person is at some level unhappy at how I went through certain experiences and I didn’t come away from them with the conclusions (politically or theologically) that I am “supposed to.”

And I was unhappy that my practical and personal experience seem to be so easily dismissed when I feel both have given me specific insights that should carry some weight.

We are operating from totally different perspectives on Capital T Truth. (Seems relevant to the protest situation of people of color and their experiences…and any other number of divides.)

We’re at an impasse of beliefs. I don’t think we’re ever going to get over it. That’s okay.

The best we can do is practice empathy and kindness, and stop trying to change the other person, or hoping they’ll “come around” to a more palatable (to us) way of thinking. I’m not going to convert this person to my way of thinking, they are not going to convert me back to their faith. We have to learn to find other ways forward.

I’m delighted to say that where once a conversation like this may have ended in tears, this one ended in jokes, story swaps, and expressions of love. We’ve had to practice kindness and respect for one another in new ways. We have to learn how to make our case and then move on, not get stuck in arguments as if life were a perpetual YouTube comment section or subreddit – what a ghastly thought!

I’m no longer trying to change minds. I don’t think I can. One has to convert, or deconvert oneself. Missionaries of all stripes may serve as catalysts to change, but all true change comes from within.

I’m not a missionary of any kind anymore, and I’m not really attempting to be. I’m simply doing what I think is right, and standing up for what I believe. I’m doing it with my voice, my vote, my money, my time, my attention, and my platforms. Perhaps it will serve as a catalyst for someone else’s introspection process, but if not, it doesn’t matter. I’ve done the internal work, and I am still doing it, and that is ultimately the only thing I am or can be responsible for. In a weird way, this is also a legacy of my Mormonism because of a bunch of other slogans and messages I picked up. Anyone who grew up in the faith will recognize perhaps the most famous,”Choose the right,” supplemented by a popular hymn called “Do What is Right.

Black lives matter.

Systemic disadvantage exists, as does systemic privilege.

LGBT+ lives matter.

Trans women are women.

Trans men are men.

Nonbinary people are real.

Patriarchy is wrong.

Separate but equal is inherently unequal, no matter how to try and swing it.

Racism, sexism and homophobia are not “mean-ness,’ they are a collective system of traditions and institutions (many of them intentional, many of them not) that cause disproportionate harm and allocate disproportionate privilege.

Kind words and actions are welcome in overcoming overt hostilities, but do not make one any less racist, sexist, or phobic if your actions and beliefs continue uphold systems and structures that continue this disproportionate harm.

And everyone needs to do the work and learn the difference between being “nice” and “good.”

Do what is right, let the consequence follow.

 

Weekend Links – Black Lives Matter

Welcome to another Friday in 2020. Congrats, we made it.

Breonna Taylor’s killers have still faced no consequences.

Jenna Wortham, a culture writer at the New York Times whose work I follow in a lot of streams, wrote a brilliant opinion piece on why #BlackLivesMatter has become a unifying theme now – 7 years after its creation and several years of being treated as “too radical.”

Some international police data for comparison.

Boy, bye.

Had a vigorous debate with a loved one about the difference

Late, but glad you’re here. (Also, when the already powerful “join” up with you, they will inevitably try and claim they were always on your side. It’s bullshit, but it doesn’t matter, because it’s evidence that your movement is winning.)

Late, but glad you’re here.

Police. Are. Not. Soliders!

An economist and public affairs scholar on the moment, the role and power of anger in both economics and policy, performative support from corporations, and elections taking place in a pandemic (which have been a shitshow in places like Georgia…by design):

Noted food writer and editor Helen Rosner on apples, and the rot thereof.

SDS Nation loves a treasure hunt.

What a stupid time to be alive.

Before we crow too loudly over stock market gains, we need to interrogate what exactly is being bought...which is a whole lot of stock in bankrupt companies at the moment. This is speculation in its original form. Maybe they will come back but maybe they won’t.

Friend of the Blog Caitlin on our unique cocktail of rage.

We are learning a lot about who is and is not “essential” in our society, and how incongruent our subsequent treatment of those groups. Agricultural workers have always been uniquely interesting to me because we simultaneously NEED them to make our production work, but we also villainize them with anti-immigrant rhetoric and crackdown on them (rather than the bosses who hire them and benefit from their cheap labor). Our whole attitude towards the people who feed us baffles me.

Amazing that this isn’t just…expected and codified already?

He’s actually unhinged. He just also happens to be dumb and bad at it.

I am 100% certain she is a better negotiator than he is. Big Cersei Lannister energy, which I grudgingly respect, given the deal she’s made and the person she’s shown herself to be.

Over in the world of literature, J.K. Rowling continues to promote some pretty aggressive anit-trans commentary and perspectives. Her platform, her right, but it’s disappointing nonetheless. As is often the case with fantasy and science fiction, those genres frequently serve as the first cultural places kids of all stripes including queer ones feel safe and understood for the first time. It’s hard when your childhood idols turn out to be just as disappointing as other adults. I hope she educates herself and expands her views because as a powerful, rich, and respected white woman with a megaphone, her words carry weight. However, this take from Harry Potter himself seems like a good one to promote rather than linking to any of her vitriol.

ContraPoints to the rescue to explain an actual trans perspective.

Let’s explore what systemic really look like, shall we?

Of course our intrepid leader spewed off his latest vile conspiracy theory after first hearing it from a “journalist” who also writes for the Russian propaganda network. OF COURSE HE DID. We live in the dumbest timeline…

It’s lynching, it’s just foregoing the rope.

Say it with me: ANTIFA is not a thing. At best it’s a VERY loose set of ideas whose adherents are not in agreement with themselves 75% of the time, are not organized in any meaningful way, and have no official representation. Contrasted with, say the KKK. At worst…it’s a fascist propaganda device.

I saw a comment that the current shift we are seeing on racial issues has a lot in common with the trajectory of gay right support. This strikes me a good comparison for a lot of reasons. Centuries of underground history, decades of small-scale protest and challenge, small radical elements advancing the cause with riots (hi Marsha P. Johnson!) while more quiet academic investigation slowly debunked false assumptions. Finally, as it became marginally and incrementally safer to be out in public, enough of the “mainstream” straight population were able to view their LGBT+ friends and loved ones and understand their experience as different but not deviant. By the time we get to enough full scale peaceful protests in support of LGBT+ rights, it’s more of a rubber stamp of majority or overwhelming public sentiment than revolution. It’s shameful how long it takes, but that trajectory makes a lot of sense for me when considering the BLM movement. Unpopular, radical, mainstream (white) resistance, publicity, accumulated public experience and evidence, subtle change, more awareness and empathy for the lived experience of actual people and less reliance on stereotypes…swift and trackable shift in public (white) opinion.